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of suspense, mario monti said he will not run for reelection. but he could lead of future italian government. and the head of the u.s. gold lobby goes on -- the u.s. gun lobby goes on television to defend his position that guns should be in every school. and trouble in south africa. hello there. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. it turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are reported to have died when the bakery they were queuing at was destroyed. the un envoy arrived in syria for more talks. we have this. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago, this area was under the control of government forces. the rebels recently opened a new battle for this section of central syria. the state still has superior firepower to the strike back. the government says it is willing to engage in dialogue, but the other side is not. >> i have general advice. time is getting short. hurry and move towar
monday night on "the communicators" on c-span2. next, 10 years of the e- government act, improving government access and productivity. this is just over one hour. >> all right, so why do we not just jump into this next panel? if ms. panel was about the tenures, this panel is really about the next 10 years. what are the big challenges year, what are the things different now? from a technology perspective, this is pretty easy. i can tell you that if we were to do this today, you would say, i cannot believe you were using lte phones and 4g, as i am using 6g. joining us is a director for cisco systems business solution group, which is a global strategy and consulting arm. prior to that, he was president and ceo of government's strategy is of a leading market research firm from 2001 to 2003 heading the industry advisory council, a founding member of a council, and he spent 28 years in the federal government, including being the first cio at the department of commerce, and he is also a winner. doug bourgeois is the chief for vmware. prior to that, he was the director of national business
to grow their own food. syria's president bashar al- assad says his government will do whatever it can to end the crisis in syria. his comments on state tv followed a meeting of the u.n. peace envoy to syria lakdar brahimi. he also says he is cooperating with lakdar brahimi, who is on a two-day visit. it coincides with a missile strike. scores of civilians killed in the attack. in the northern city of aleppo rebel fighters say they captured a military base. russia's foreign minister says he received guarantees from president assad he will not use chemical weapons against rebels. >> i met president assad and we exchanged views on the next steps that can be taken to move forward. the president spoke of his viewpoint and i told of what i gathered from my many meetings i of that indifference cities and with various officials in the region and outside the region. we also discussed the steps i see it can be taken to help the syrian people come out of the crisis. the situation in syria remains of high concern and with the party's move of the direction of a solution that the people of this --
from them. their families are in all our thoughts. i also want to welcome the government announcement today on reducing the number of troops in afghanistan during 2013. we await the defense secretary's statement -- can the prime minister tell the house how many troops and civilians will be left with in afghanistan after the 2014 deadline, and whether they will be there under afghan- led command? >> i join the leader of the opposition in welcoming what our troops do. on afghanistan, we have to decisions to make. first of all, the decision about the drawdown between now and the end of 2013, and what the defense secretary would announce is because of the success of our forces and the afghan national security forces and the fact that we are moving from a man during a battalion level to mentoring at a grade level by the end of 2013, will be able to see troops come home in two steps, leaving about 5200 troops after the end of 2013. compared with the 9000 we have now. it is to pay tribute to the incredible work they have done, many coming back for tour after tour. this book with particularly
. they were passing right-to-work laws. they were receiving lots of funding from the federal government to build military installations at a time when the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. so states like mississippi, states like georgia and texas and florida and southern california, arizona, north carolina are all being transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. really does three from 1964 to two dozen eight could be thought of as kind of the carried of sun belt dominance in american presidential history. if you think about every president elected from 1964-2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected. he was not even elected vice president. he was a michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. first george bush, texas by a connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election. it is this 40 year perio
a concentrated power in the entire american history. one looked at the union government and the structure of the state's and the confederacy and said that was the lead by a fine state. the united states never had a government that big until the new deal. fin day had to build this enormous central state. think of that. they passed taxes within a year. and agents of the federal government literally taking food out of people's barnes. the only way to feed the army. that is fascinating that the slaveholders go to war to protect slavery than they think the new government will protect their slaves during war but it turns out they needs to use them to win the war. added it is an enormous tussle the also wrote a clause in the constitution that congress could never abolish slavery. they had a problem of sovereignty. they could not reach the slaves. they cannot reach them without the permission of the owner. they had codified the status of slaves as private property. can you imagine they were mortgaged up to the eyeballs. they all must talk about the angle, the powerful ally and to say slays don't
to social entrepreneurs. we focus on organizations working outside of government because we feel societe has more flexibility ban government contractors. charities used to be independent but now are contractors to the government. that is all you need the social impact bond to hold them accountable. john: i would rather use the money than government but government is captured. >> ben taxpayers want to know they get something for it to. recently these agencies have a good cause. that is different of kids not going back to jail. john: mark zuckerberg maybe feeling guilty gave $100 million to the new work public-school system. i see that it throws a down the drain giving it to the union's who ruined it in the first place. >> don't fund the problem. find the solution. that means if you see something terrible of the world, poverty you have to say our not just give money to anti-poverty but give money to organization and has a way to tackle the issue. john: how do know it will work? goldman sachs puts up their own money. john: you will give them yoga and meditation therapy? it sounds like nonsense.
is a lower price again companies trying to have to pay the government more money. gerri: let's talk about 201 201n what we might expect. expectations over the place. citigroup predicted stocks 14% next year, morgan stanley 1%. where do you fall? >> i'm probably up at 4% or 5%. not expecting that great of a year as far as the end of the year. i think it will be pretty bumpy the beginning of the year while this all gets worked out and people reevaluate the landscape ofds everything. gerri, i will comment on the numbers you threw out there. this scares me people are so positive. i don't want to spike the eggnog, but the fact there is not one person or one bank that says the market will be down next year frightens me a little bit. gerri: wells fargo says the market will be down 2%. but they're the only ones to sae it. a lotbo of optimism but we have beenbe in this bull market for a long time it v has been very strong. people start that in the same thing happen over and over again. is that what you see your fellow strategists make? >> sometimes, you chase the returns and end up getting in at the l
to competition. and they build school cars and space ships. >> entrepreneurs do what only governments did before. >> maybe cities will be built on water flow from big government. >> this is outside the united states jurisdiction. >> life gets better because ideas have sex. >> wait, ideas have sex? >> yes. >> ideas spread. when they meet they can mate. >> because of that we live in a wonderful world. that is our show tonight. >> now, john stossel. ♪ i think to myself ♪ what wonderful world >> what a wonderful world? what are they talking about? all we hear from the media is doom, unemployment, pollution, social conflict, all the things exist but couldn't once in a while someone put it in perspective? this man did that. i usually don't like to put on swedish public health professionals or danish public health professionals they put the world's attentiongentleman because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine for the very first
of the confederation, that government is too weak so we are starting to write the constitution. this is where the second amendment obviously comes. how did this all develop? >> guest: nowadays it's become fashionable among the people that support them rights strongly to pick out this or that quotation from that leader like samuel adams or thomas jefferson or whoever and implied that in the second amendment is basically seen as a rate of the individuals to defend themselves and defend themselves against the government when it became tyrannical. that is a misunderstanding. it was a political matter in the second amendment. it was a part of what became the bill of rights, and the reason for it is that when -- after the unhappy experience of the articles of the confederation led the founders to try to figure out a better way of governing this country, they came up with a constitution that is full of checks and balances, but as it was submitted to the states for the ratification it became clear that they might not get the nine states they needed unless there were promises of still more controls ov
i will carry the report to london. they decided they could not afford it. the royal government sent their own report. so in 1775 that is why the massachusetts government was not willing to spend the money. they knew they could be skipped if they did not. >>. >> we will continue questions downstairs. also signings of the book. let's continue downstairs. for our panelists. robert, a tired, and john todd andrlik is a publisher of raglan did, >> it is always a treat to be in this store it is a wonderland. about five years ago a friend suggested that i share rightabout ms. green. [laughter] i said to? she was called the which up on wall street. she was interesting but finance and wall street? then it was 2008. and everything changed the stock market collapsed collapsed, real-estate prices plunged and we were in a financial panic i started to think more about ms. green and how she's survived ms. green and how she's survived many financial crisis. there were no diaries then i remember something that was said that nice girls keep diaries. bad girls do not have time last laugh and hetty gree
and the fact that we have risen to the governance of this country. the fact that we have changed the opportunity. last night, i have the opportunity to listen to an 86- year-old honoree at the gathering last night. she's had spoken about how her life was different and the opportunities that were denied because she was jewish. because of the efforts of norm and mike and your leade in, asiy are not denied opportunities because of where they come from. we are aspiring and we are leaving california and america in a new generation. -- leading california and america in a new generation. we have an obligation to lead in the 21st century. we are providing leadership in all areas that govern this country. technology, health, academia, commerce, art, entertainment, and government. today, we must come together, not only in celebration, but an acknowledgment of the work that lies ahead. we understand that this is a global economy. the opportunities are ones that we can only surpassed if we come together. we can win the future if we dream together, if we work together. as a society, as an eco
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
the government, of the moral condemnation. the answer in the double jeopardy clause it wants. >> starting monday, c-span is featuring supreme court's oral arguments before the war on the bench. all this week it 7:00 eastern time. listen in the baltimore area. for online c-span.org. >> brown university held the discussion about polls were saying before and after the 2012 presidential election. the associate research director explained. he also talked about the future of presidential polling. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone i and the professor of public policy and director here at brown university. i am happy to welcome you to another installment of the speaker series. the luncheon speaker series is one of the of any event. it attempts to inform brown and a larger community about important matters related to government, politics, and public policy. over the years the speaker series has been a wonderful opportunity for the undergraduate students and masters did it a public policy to connect with of foreign- policy thinkers. we're just pleased this afternoon to welcome the associate dir
will it be from a weather standpoint? but first the federal hot minute. >> the business of government is going through a dynamic change driven by se quest tration as well as other business trends. there's no shortage on this topic. stansomeloway urges the government not to repeat the mistakes made in the early 1990's. the last time we saw significant budget cuts. the cuts were made across the board and procurement work was impacted. he says that the cut must be more strategic. the articles sites from the 18th annual survey. it should be no surprise when you see the results of another survey. that shows how government contractors are seeking revenue in parks outside but adjacent to other governments. >> all right. three storms we're keeping our eye on. >> a lot of us will see a few flakes of snow. and at some point minority and west of d.c., fredrick county into low den -- louden county. we may see some heavier snow. but it's not going to stick. it's conversationtialal type of snow. >> you should be fine tomorrow. if you head out the door and you're going t
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
, and it would each without utterly beknighted agricultural policies followed by until federal government with subsidizing -- that was a pleatly unnecessary aside -- completely unnecessary aside, i apologize for that. [laughter] originally, it was moved over vast distances in that quite tasty form of whiskey. we then moved to pigs which are, of course, corn with feet -- [laughter] b we have always preferred salted pork to salted beef, and then once this character, armor, figures out about refrigerated rail cars, you put the blocks of ice on top rather or than below the beef so that cold water drips down, you're able to have a single great stockyard in chicago which is moving that, those corn-fed beef in a cost efficient manner east. now, even though cities form for utterly prosaic reasons, miracles happen when smart people come to being around each other, when they learn from one another. think about athens 2500 years ago, or think about florence 600 years ago in the age of the me dissi where a city built on wool and banking, a city who connected brilliant people and learned from one anot
will officially re-sign from his post on friday. he stressed that italy's next government must avoid backtracking on reforms. elections are due to return in january. sylvia berlusconi met up with cnbc and began by asking him whether he will be running in the upcoming elections. >> translator: yes. obviously, this wasn't my original intention or a desirable option. i had to surrender to reality. and my sense of responsibility convinced me to run again for a premiership. actually, this need come from the polls. a angelino alfamo is capable, but only my participation would have brought back all the voters who supported us in 2008 which represented almost 40% of the total of italian voters. i had to admit what the data was saying as i did in 2004. i feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party that isn't at all social democratic, but has its roots firmly pointed in the communist orthodox party. >> under market and in europe, there is some concern that your return in politics may bring back italy to the latest borrow of 20
of those outside the box ideas that the federal government should take seriously here? >> first of all, i don't know -- i would like to know, first of all how many schools there are in america. high schools, middle schools, preschools, private christian academies? the point is this is unfeasible. i'm not sure it's the right way to go to put an armed guard in every single school in america. who will pick up the taxpayer dla are on that? the counties, it is states? the locals the feds? who will do this? it's impractical. to the some mention i don't like guns in our schools. it's a nice political sound bite and they can use an old statement from bill clinton to say this, but i'm not sure it's a practical idea, frankly. >> first of all, when it comes to education, decisions really do need to be handled on a local level. that's how education decisions should be made. but at the same time i do support the idea of consideration putting an armed patrol officer. my sister in atlanta works at a receiving desk, and she's not prepared or trained for dealing with someone coming into the school. i woul
and the government's failings in the war in thoroanistan. ...n w well-known face for c-span viewers mary frances berry professor at the university of pennsylvania also of the author of several books. we're at the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about and justice for all. the united states commission on civil rights in the continuing struggle for freedom in america quote. when did this all rights commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it.
supporter of the royal government and was driven out of town because the. >> on the other side of that, nobody is on many different sources of media that we can kind of fat check. how often was the president of the newspaper or drastic exaggeration and outright lies to gain support or to turn people directly to one side or the other? >> you're definitely finding exaggerations, whether it's drastic or not. but is interested in finding was that a lot of newspaper accounts came as disclaimers. so publishers of the newspapers, printers cite reliable sources and a thesaurus is questionable, they would frequently printouts of the article and some sort of disclaimer. >> i remember there is a letter published the battle of lexington and concord to talk to the british soldiers coming and rampaging through and killing the barnyard animals. that never happened. there is a letter about the battle of upper hill says it's in the soldiers reached charlestown, some of them try to desert and runaway and how two of them sprang up immediately. i didn't have any there. definitely propaganda pieces. fatah
-term opponent to the u.s. government. and that gets him a lot of notoriety in the 19th century as well. >> so, where did brigham young come from and began his life? >> he grew up in basically a state western new york. he came from a very poor family. he didn't have any formal education. and was impoverished, really hard childhood. his family moved around a lot. once he was out on his own he moved around a lot. he was a craftsman, kind of a furniture paynter and never really got ahead. in his life entirely changed once he converted to mormonism when he was a little bit more than 30-years-old. >> so how did he need joseph smith etc? >> the book of mormon, shortly after it was published in 1830 some of his family members read it. he later said that he read it and he spent a lot of time thinking and out. he didn't jump on board right away, she was a little bit skeptical and a little uncertain and spend a couple of years considering the claim of this new work of scripture. then he encountered a group of traveling mormon elder is your missionaries and he sold them speak in tom. something that he ha
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
the government, better be a buyer than a seller. compromise is far, far more likely than not, despite last night's shenanigashenanigans. jack in florida, jack? >> caller: i read your book. i enjoyed it very much. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm following a sector rotation strategy with some of my investments. currently in the material sector. and hoping to catch more of the housing uprise. but with the fiscal cliff looming, i was wondering if you would advise more defenseless strategy like consumer staples or something going into the new year. >> what i was thinking i told a friend of mine today conagra reported an amazing number. that's the kind of thing i would think about. nice yield. good growth. i think that's the best idea. why don't we go to brooks in ohio. brooks was here. brooks? >> caller: my question is about abbott, the split, how's it going down and which side are you on? >> good news today. the split will be included in the s&p which is why it was up. abbott is going higher. that's why my travel trust owns it. things seem dysfunctional in washington but even now it's better to be a bu
the opposition, the government, or by these subgroups looking to make money in terms of ransoming off people back to the family. that's one whole aspect in any sort of civil war type situation, which it really is right now. you have the criminalization of society in many ways from people who are trying to make a living possible, and then you have groups that become invested in the civil war and the continuing of the civil war you saw something similar in lebanon. i wrote a piece recently in monitor called the lebanonizeation of syria, and unfarmly, of the many scenarios that could occur, in syria, because it does seem to be -- there's no easy answer. there is absolutely no easy answer to this. american intervention is not the answer. and i would be happy to talk more about that perhaps in the q & a session. what happened in -- what will happen probably in syria, unless the equation on one side or the ice dramatically changed. you have this balance of forces almost where neither side has the wherewithal to land the knockout punch and both sides think they can win and it's very difficult to interve
to the federal budget, how big is the federal budget? how much money does the government take in? how much do we spend? how much is $167 trillion for the current debt? guest: spending this year will be $33.8 trillion. the deficit of about $1 trillion that is for fiscal 2013. that assumes that somehow the fiscal cliff doesn't happen and we don't reduce the deficit by $600 billion. national debt, about $16 billion , debt held by the public -- as a percentage it is getting up there. we've had it before. as we talked about two weeks ago it is not so much that the size of the debt it is how fast the debt is growing in comparison to the size of the economy. you don't want to pay off the debt but you want it to fall. host: how did we get to this point? why is the government spending so much and under this president, we've seen the debt go up $1 trillion each year over the last four years. where is it going? guest: there are two main ways to look at it. right now, we're still coming out of this economic crisis. so you have large debts for four years mainly because you have low revenues as people don't h
regulating environment where we put regulations and we would put government regulations that is a part of self regulation. we saw regulate ourselves and create rules for ourselves that is self regulation. we also regulate each other for competition. there is scarce resources just like in the rainforest but the main thing that keeps the rainforest fiber and is that you have the canopy which in the u.s. economy would be the first, wal-mart, all that. and then you've got all the small business, but it's the small and growing. it's the things that were small but can challenge and it's what happens when the big truth falls over and then the amazing thing is it grows right out of it, right out of their. that's a metaphor, but it's real. because when we lose something day in the economy it's vital that we know how to reconfigure the resources and create something new out of it. so, do we need control? we need feedback loops to repurchase in this country we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and why people
substantially more, on the federal government side, as an inducement to states and local governments to make the investments they need to make. man: but the federal role is going to continue to be diminished because of so many competing demands. so the expectation that the federal government will step in and infuse a lot of capital into water infrastructure, i think, is doubtful. and whether they should or not, i think, will continue to be debated. narrator: where money continues to be elusive, some cities and towns are turning their assets over to private companies, hoping the private sector can find the solutions they cannot. man: in the u.s., roughly 90% of all water and wastewater systems are still publicly owned and publicly managed. the remaining 10% are managed by privately held companies. man: the private sector has learned to become very efficient, and frequently a municipality can save themselves a significant amount of money by bringing in a private company. this is not true in all cases. there are some exceptionally well-run municipalities, but they do have to deal with a city go
for government to keep raising the value added tax. we've seen it happened in spain, italy and greece and wherever it's tried. adam: i lived in spain a long time ago. i guess you realize you don't paying it at the time but things are more expensive. david: thank you, gang. thank you very much. thanks to the company. thanks to you for watching. now here are dagen and dennis. hi, gang. dagen: merry christmas. love to your family. david: thank you. same to yours. dagen: i'm dagen mcdowell everybody. dennis: i'm dennis neal -- kneale. dagen: is it the fiscal cliff fears that have shoppers down this season? retailers are reporting slowing sales over the last couple of weeks. dennis: a woman fired for being too attractive and a supreme court says it is legal. dagen: i will bite my tongue because it is the top of the hour and stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides at the new york stock exchange. hey nicole. nicole: i look forward to hearing more about that particular story as i watch the stock market here, i do see the dow is down about 1/3 of 1%. majority of the dow components a
says the federal government needs to do a better job enforcing the ones already on the books. duarte? >> thank you, tara mergener, in washington. >>> now, there's just one week left until the fiscal deadline. the president and congress are on holiday break. before he went on break he called for a limited extension on tax cuts for americans. the last best hope for a deal may rest in the senate. yesterday senator lindsey graham said he would vote for a revenue increase including a tax hike, but he doesn't like it. >> hikes are part of the solution driven by the president but he's going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can protect 99% of the americans from a tax hike, that is not a tax increase in my books. >> if there's no deal on new year's day, households between $50,000 and $75,000 will see an increase of $2,399. meanwhile households with $5 money,0 $00,000 to 1 mill could see an crease of $3900. >>> overseas an attack on americans in afghanistan. police officers, over 50 have been killed by police and soldiers this year. >>> in syria a british-based human r
is the federal government on?" rep. john lewis: i did ask the question. i did raise the question, "i want to know: which side is the federal government on? " because it appeared, in certain parts of the south, the federal government was not on the right side of history. it appeared that the federal government was not a sympathetic referee in the struggle for civil rights. we felt that the federal government could do more, the department of justice could do more, the fbi could do more, than just stand back and take pictures. we thought they could prevent some of the violence and protect people that were being arrested, being beaten and being killed. amy goodman: i'd like to play danny glover reading the excerpts of the speech that you didn't give. danny glover: "to those who have said, 'be patient and wait,' we must say that 'patience' is a dirty and nasty word. we cannot be patient. we do not want to be free gradually. we want our freedom, and we want it now. we cannot depend on any political party, for both the democrats and the republicans have betrayed the basic principles of the declaration o
spend most of my days doing government relations consulting and served as government affairs for gavin noose som when he was mayor. i served on the commission for a year and a half. it's an incredible honor because i have spent time working on womens' issues in the womens' community and i also spend time working closely with the jewish community relations council which i am a member so it's an honor to be tonight to focus on this issues. >> thank you. commissioner shorter. >> good evening everyone. again thank you to the police commissioners for joining us this evening and i am very excited as well in terms of what we can do together on the issues, particularly about domestic violence. again i am andrea shorter and on the commission for status of women for 12 years now, so during the day time i try to do as little as possible, but for reasons the demands don't allow for that. i work as a political strategists and leadership development consultant and that is built on years of working in criminal and juvenile justice reform as well as in the womens' community as well as the lgbt com
an armed guard at columbine. now, rather than creating new laws, the nra says the federal government needs to do a better job enforcing the ones already on the books. >> thank you, tara mergener, in washington. >>> now, there's one week till the fiscal deadline. the president and congress are on holiday break. the last best hope for a deal may rest in the senate. yesterday senator lindsey graham said he would vote for a revenue increase including a tax hike, but doesn't like it. >> hikes are part of the solution driven by the president but he's going to get tax rate hikes. to my republican colleagues, if we can prevent 99% of the americans from a tax hike, that's not an increase in my book. >> households between 50 and $75,000 will see a an increase of $2,399. meanwhile households of. >>> overseas an attack on americans in afghanistan. police officer police officers, over 50 have been killed by police and soldiers this year. >>> a british-based group said over 60 people were killed. yesterday's air strike was an apparent retaliation for new rebel offensive. elizabeth palmer visited the to
kind of a year are you expecting in 2013? >> i think a good year. i think if the government can just get out of the way, go ahead and tell us what the rules are going to be, whatever they're going to be. make the rules step up to the plate and act responsibly, make some decisions. and then i think the free market system and our business leaders and businesses, small business owners, will make it work. >> are a lot of people in business talking about what's going on with guns and the potential for new gun legislation? i mean, this week we saw sporting goods chain dick's stop selling assault rifles. private equity firm saying it's going to sell its interest in the freedom group all in the wake of the tragedy we're still in mourning over, in connecticut. do you think we'll see real change in gun laws? >> yeah, because i think the president is committed to bringing something forward very quickly. senator feinstein is bringing something up, as well. i don't think there's any business person that i've come across that -- over the last week or so that has not talked about what's happened he
opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposit
. if it cannot abe future that is 100% in accordance with its core beliefs and principles that's not governing. that's lobbing hand grenades. if you are only stabbeding on principle to appear taller, then you appear smaller, and the gop is shrinking daily before our eyes. if leadership casting vision, calling all your people to rise up, and we just watched what happened with lan b and speaker boehner trying to call his people to rise up, and you say his leadership really not in question unless paul ryan really wants it. do you think that people having these types of perspectives, like a mark mckinnan, that doesn't really ring true coming into the new year for speaker boehner. >> look, the problem for republicans and for moderate republicans like mark mckinnan is most of the people in the house are not of the mark mckinnan stripe. these are people who are from districts where they've won with 60% of the vote or more. the majority of them. the majority of their constituents don't want them to compromise on things that they find important like taxes. why someone like mitt romney winds up getting
libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and accolades. he was the same guy. lingering one night after dinner to help me with a difficult table, i referred to him as sir or ambassador. he looked at me for a second, he sighs and he said i wish everyone would just call me chris. he loved the work, loved the people, but he never took himself too seriously. people talk about what a good diplomat he was. he knew how to motivate others to be the same. even those down on their careers, lost faith, in hardship. this was a tough task to inspire other to serve with dignity and self-respect. chris knew how to do that. nothing we can say here can make up for the heart ache and
capturing the political process, getting the government contracts and affecting outcomes we are also subject to that. and to see somebody say those things is a lot more than i say in my book but what you are saying is true in its deeply important. >> philip auerswald, you write about the current telecommunications revolution that we are all living and trying to understand and manage. helpless. >> so, first of all, we have to understand the difference between a mobile phone and a rich country and a mobile phone and most of the world. so, before the mobile phone only to technologies had spread as widely as the mobile phone. no technology has spread as rapidly as the mobile phone. the only other recent one was the transistor radio and before that, it was fired to spread as wildly. so, what is the -- we know what it means in our lives and what smart phones been and all that but what does it mean for the majority of the world's population. it was built highways, communication highways and labor never connected before. in afghanistan we talk about story that you asked about entrepreneurs and was r
brings. today, we gather in this hallowed temple to representative government dedicated to the enjoyment of life and its blessings by its citizens, to honor aung san suu kyi. we are honored by her presence and her heroic witness to the dignity of each person, most especially in her native land of burma. her story is known to all, her example among the greatest of our time, of all time. we ask that as we come together to honor her, you bless our gathering. may we all be emboldened to give of our life as she has done, to stand up for human freedom wherever it may be denied. and bless her most noble of causes. move the hearts of those who would deny freedom to her and to the people of burma. may our actions today add to the universal out cry for justice and freedom so that the blessings of life will burst forth for the citizens of aung san suu kyi's need of burma. -- native burma. god bless the nation of burma and bless the united states of america. amen. >> please be seated. >> ladies and gentlemen, the honorable joseph crowley, representative of the seventh district of new york. >> thank
overseas. that's right i heard me right. there are reports that syria may have used a separate government air strike that killed dozens of people waiting outside a bakery yesterday. they may have used chemical weapons for that. what may be more troubling is the report of seven others killed in an area currently controlled by the rebels when they inhaled an apparently poisonness gas sprayed by the syrian army. president obama had already declared that there is a red line regarding the use of chemical weapons on the syrian people. so now there are growing questions as to what if anything the u.s. cou should do if we are forced to respond. bob scales is a retired u.s. army major general and fnc military analyst. general, merry christmas, thanks for joining us. >> merry christmas to you too, jaime. jaime: you have to become more concerned about syria at this point. have they crossed the red line and should we respond. >> first of all let's be clear that most initial reports are wrong. it could be what is used is white phosphorus which is not a chemical weapon, when it's dropped from an aircra
leaders are charging fraud. official results are due tomorrow. >> a syrian government air strike in a town near the city of homa has reportedly killed dozens. peateur video appears to show the aftermath of the attack which struck a bakery where people were lining up for their first bread in days. in damascus, meanwhile, u.n. peace envoy brahimi arrived today for more talks with president assad. in his attempt to remain in power, assad has cultivated the support of minority groups athin his ethically divided country. elizabeth palmer saw that policy at work during a recent visit to the southern town of swada. >> reporter: conflict has engulfed syria over the past months from one end of the country to the other. but so far it barely touched this town in southern syria near the border with jordan. the people who live here are a religious group that has allied itself with president assad. good afternoon. when we arrived it in town to meet the governor, syrian state media was waiting for us. the regime is anxious to showcase this community full of official supporters willing to reinforce the pa
observation on the unchanging nature of governance comes in its screen play based in part on the book "team of rivals." recently, the script received the new york film critics circle award, one of what will doubtless be many honors. tony first came to most people's attention with the epic play "angels in america," a devastating account of the a.i.d.s. epidemic while it was at its worst. tony received both a tony award and the pulitzer prize for drama as well as a primetime emmy award for its television adaptation on hbo. that was some 20 years ago. in the years since, tony's reputation as one of our most accomplished and sometimes controversial modern play writes has only grown. welcome. >> thank you. >> you said you worked six years. how did you go about the research? >> i just started reading. we started with doris' book. i was curious to read it. it's a great read and a great book, but it's the definition of a thing that can turn into a 2 1/2 hour script. i knew immediately from what i had read there was going to be too much material if we tried to cover the whole thing and the civil war
because it's big, wasteful government. it doesn't need to be that way if we were empowering people to succeed on the front end. >> mayor, we're going to make you late, so i'm going to offer one thought before you check out and give you the last word, and that is -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> when we first met, i remember saying to you that i liked your tie, and you took that tie off and gave it to me. and i think that you offer that to the country. you offer us your light, and so many of us, 1.2 million on twitter, but lots of folks we can tell you all across the country on the book tour ask us about you, about the light that you draw us to, hope, optimism and knowing that the future for this country is bright if we're in it together. i was stumped, by the way, in anchorage when a woman asked me, is he really as sexy as he seems? [laughter] i said -- >> i'm what you call a 40-footer. i look much better from far away. >> but i want to thank you for the light that you shared with us in this book and the light that you bring to the people of newark, but the light that yo
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